Don E. Gibbons, Ph.D., NJ Licensed Psychologist #03513
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The New Center for Counseling and Psychotherapy, LLC

The New Center for Counseling and Psychotherapy, LLC, is located at 675 Route 72 E Manahawkin, NJ 08050. Telephone us at(609)709-2043 and (609) 709-0009.Take Mill Creek Road South, just off Route 72, on the road to Beach Haven West.After about 400 feet, turn right into the office complex of Greater Coastal Realty. Then turn right and go past the Lyceum Gyn. Continue on to the Prudential Zack Building. We. are the last office at the end. We accept Medicare and most other major insurance.Weekend and evening office hours are avalable.

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Saturday, May 18, 2013

What are the Legal Requirements for a Ph.D? NOTHING!


I can run off a Ph.D. degree on my computer and give it to you, and you can say that you have a Ph.D. and you won't be breaking any law. The only time they can prosecute you is when you offer your services to the public in a license-protected occupation. The same thing, of course, applies to certifications of all kinds. In New Jersey at least, a non-profit organization such as a church can hire you without having to comply without having to comply with formal licensing requirements, regardless of whether or not you have a real degree, or a phony one, or no degree at all.  There aren't any restrictions on forming an educational institution either. It is easy to incorporate "universities" with impressive-sounding titles, offering courses and degrees in all sorts of subjects, who may then group themselves into unsanctioned regional associations to accredit each other -- and they do! 

I once met a man in the U.S. a few years ago who was offering a Ph.D. in hypnosis after only a few months of study, which created quite a stir in some lay hypnosis circles and made him a lot of money before the word got around. I subsequently had a telephone conversation with one of his "graduates," who was vigorously defending the academic content of her "doctoral program" from this man, which she had completed after a few months of study. I told her that I had no doubt that he had put together some good reading lists which incorporated a lot of sound psychological principles. But, having spent thirteen years of my life earning a "real" doctorate which was recognized by the proper regional accrediting body (and not one which had been organized by the diploma mills themselves in order to accredit each other), I assured her that a doctoral program such as the one she had completed would be so adulterated by comparison as to be totally useless in the real world. Her voice suddenly began to quaver. (I'm not sure she really knew what "adulterated" meant, and probably mistook it for something stronger!), and our conversation ended shortly thereafter. I don't know whether or not this guy is still around, but I haven't heard anything about him or his program in several years.
Whenever you hear someone say that they can paper the wall of their office with their academic degrees, or see an official-looking diploma signed by people who have a large number of degrees in several different fields after their name, this should be a signal to examine the situation further.(Just think how many years or decades it would take to actualy earn all those degrees!) Most of the people who signed my own doctorate, for example, used no initials at all after their name, and let the title of their position speak for them, as is often the custom.  
A legitimate degree which is recognized by established institutions of higher learning must be offered by an institution which is recognized by the officially recognized accrediting body in your locality, and no other. The best way to establish this is to call up the Registrar's office of an institution which you trust, and inquire as to the legitimacy of the accrediting body behind the college or university which you are inquiring about -- keeping in mind, of course, that the officially sanctioned organizations in some regions may also be more lax than in others.

Of course, formal certification, credentialing, and professional licensing is no guarantee of character, nor is it always a guarantee of competence. On the other hand, there are many fine and capable people who have various types of alternative qualifications or the lack thereof, many of whom I count among my friends. On the other hand, there are at least some people with sterling credentials whose moral qualifications are less than honorable. All that can be conclusively said is that when it comes to professional qualifications, things are not always what they seem to be. 

 

In no particular order, here are just a few the other practical applications of hyperempiria, or suggestion-enhanced experience, contained on this Blog,  You can learn how to:
See also the following print sources:

Gibbons, D. E. (2001). Experience as an art form. .New York, NY: Authors Choice Press.

Gibbons, D. E. (2000). Applied hypnosis and hyperempiria. Lincoln, NE: Authors Choice Press (originally published 1979 by Plenum Press).

Gibbons, D. E., & Cavallaro, L (2013).. Exploring alternate universes: And learning what they can teach us. Amazon Kindle E-Books. (Note: It is not necessary to own a Kindle reader to download this e-book, as the Kindle app may be downloaded free of charge to a standard desktop or laptop computer and to most cell phones.)

Gibbons, D. E., & Lynn, S. J. (2010). Hypnotic inductions: A primer. in S. J. Lynn, J. W. Rhue, & I. Kirsch (Eds.) Handbook of clinical hypnosis, 2nd ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, pp. 267-291.

Thursday, May 9, 2013

How to Hypnotize the Un-Hypnotizable

Despite claims to the contrary, most induction procedures work about equally well; and the differences in responsiveness are due to personality or situational variables, which sometimes can be the deciding factor in whether or not a particular induction will succeed (Gibbons & Lynn, 2010).  However, decades of laboratory research involving hundreds of investigators (Hull, 1933; Shor & Orne, 1962; Spiegel, 1974), have conclusively demonstrated that for everyone who responds poorly, you are statistically certain to find someone who responds so well that perseverance in the use of hypnosis will be amply rewarded over time.

For those who have difficulty being hypnotized and who would like some help, there is a free group at www.hypnothoughts.com entitled, "Hard to Hypnotize?"  which is specifically for those who have difficulty being hypnotized. whose leader,  widely-respected hypnotist, +John Cleesattel,  makes the unconditional promise: "If you have tried many times and still have had no success, contact me and together we can make it happen."   +Michael Ellner also makes the following excellent suggestions: 
Try warming you hand with a hair dryer and then try to mentally recreate the sensation. Next bite into a slice of a lemon and then try to mentally recreate the taste of the lemon. Keep at it until you can easily warm your hands and taste the lemon by just thinking about it.  Next work on sensing a tingling in your finger tips when you can do this move the sensation into your hands. These simple exercises should be a gateway to learning how to create sensations by just thinking about it. 

This makes a good beginning, but it still does not enable us to realize the full potential of hypnosis. To go farther requires patient leading, under the guidance of a trained professional. Many professional hypnotists have large and highly successful practices; and I am able to employ hypnosis in my general psychology practice on a daily basis, for a wide variety of purposes.  


See also:   

What is "The Power of Suggestion?

How to Cure the "I Don't Think I Can be Hypnotized" Syndrome

Trance is NOT Necessary for Hypnosis
                   


Sources and Citations

Gibbons, D. E. (2001). Experience as an art form. .New York, NY: Authors Choice Press.



Gibbons, D. E. (2000). Applied hypnosis and hyperempiria. Lincoln, NE: Authors Choice Press (originally published 1979 by Plenum Press).

Gibbons, D. E., & Cavallaro, L (2013).. Exploring alternate universes: And learning what they can teach us. Amazon Kindle E-Books. (Note: It is not necessary to own a Kindle reader to download this e-book, as the Kindle app may be downloaded free of charge to a standard desktop or laptop computer and to most cell phones.)

Gibbons, D. E., & Lynn, S. J. (2010). Hypnotic inductions: A primer. in S. J. Lynn, J. W. Rhue, & I. Kirsch (Eds.) Handbook of clinical hypnosis, 2nd ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, pp. 267-291.

Hull, C. L.. (1933). Hypnosis and suggestibility: An experimental approach. New York: Appleton-Century.

 Shor, R. E., & Orne, E. C. (1962). Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A. Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press.

Spiegel, H. (1974). The grade 5 syndrome: The highly hypnotizable person. International Journal of clinical and experimental hypnosis, 22(4), pp. 303-319. 



 

In no particular order, here are just a few the other practical applications of hyperempiria, or suggestion-enhanced experience, contained on this Blog,  You can learn how to:



Saturday, May 4, 2013

Hypnosis and Hyperempiria -- Perfect Together!

Like peanut butter and jam.
I have previously been inclined to refer to hypnosis and hyperempiria as two distinct approaches to induction, one based on expressed or implied suggestions of drowsiness and sleep, and the other based on suggestions of enhanced alertness and sensitivity. But they don't have to be separate, and in actual practice they often are used together. 

Michael Ellner has written, "I do often have my clients switching from "hypnotic" to "hyperempiric" states of mind with the belief that doing so translates into a neurophysiology that seems to increase hypnotic outcomes in the same way that conventional hypnotic fractionalization seems to increase hypnotic outcomes."

Instead of continually bringing clients out of hypnosis and then re-hypnotizing them in order to increase depth, as is done in conventional fractionalization techniques, Ellner takes them "down" into hypnosis and "up" into hyperempiria, so that they can go both deeper and higher, deriving greater benefits from the combined experience. "I think hypnotic influence is most effective in natural default states that occur when people focus on A and put B, C, D, etc. out of their awareness during the activity -- we can think of this as a trance or not." Fable Goodman has subsequently pointed out that the technique pf alternating between diminished and higher experiences of consciousness was originated by Masters and Houston in 1970. But in actual practice, how you get to a different experience of consciousness is less important than how  you use it after you get there.

In our chapter on inductions in the Handbook of Clinical Hypnosis, Lynn and I have noted, "Given the inherent flexibility of hypnotic interventions, inductions can contain a mix of hyperempiric and relaxation-based or even sleepy-drowsy suggestions" (Gibbons & Lynn, 2010, pp,381-382). Since hyperempiria literally means enhanced experience, when a hypnotized person is given suggestions to increase his or her responsiveness, the hypnotist is using hyperempiric suggestions, or a combination of hypnotic and hyperempiric suggestions, in order to bring about the change which s/he desires. If I suggest, for example, that when a people need to study for a forthcoming test, they will be able to touch their thumb and forefinger together and that will give them the extra boost of energy that they need to study effectively and well, that is still a hyperempiric suggestion even though it may have been given within the context of traditional hypnosis.

Another example has been provided by +Kelley Woods  who writes: "Your cite from your primer reminds me of of how I might, when anchoring a sense of calm or peace with a finger clasp mechanism, suggest a client intensify that feeling even more by pumping or pulsing those fingers together. This very act builds belief and affords relief...our ultimate goal! . . Hypnosis and hyperempiria go together like peanut butter and jam!"  


 

In no particular order, here are just a few the other practical applications of hyperempiria, or suggestion-enhanced experience, contained on this Blog,  You can learn how to:
See also the following print sources:

Gibbons, D. E. (2001). Experience as an art form. .New York, NY: Authors Choice Press.


Gibbons, D. E. (2000). Applied hypnosis and hyperempiria. Lincoln, NE: Authors Choice Press (originally published 1979 by Plenum Press).

Gibbons, D. E., & Cavallaro, L (2013).. Exploring alternate universes: And learning what they can teach us. Amazon Kindle E-Books. (Note: It is not necessary to own a Kindle reader to download this e-book, as the Kindle app may be downloaded free of charge to a standard desktop or laptop computer and to most cell phones.)

Gibbons, D. E., & Lynn, S. J. (2010). Hypnotic inductions: A primer. in S. J. Lynn, J. W. Rhue, & I. Kirsch (Eds.) Handbook of clinical hypnosis, 2nd ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, pp. 267-291.


Thursday, May 2, 2013

How the Brain Copes with Anxiety and Panic Attacks


This could have been said equally well by Buddha, Beck, or Albert Ellis!

Eastern philosophers are completely in agreement with Western cognitive-behavioral psychology concerning the cause of unhappiness. They differ only in their approach.

Western scientists are currently discovering how your brain can learn to turn anxiety into calmness, as expressed in the following video by Martin L. Rossman, M.D., speaking at the University of San Francisco.



For more instruction in guided imagery, see:  "How to Hypnotize Yourself Using the Best Me Technique."
For more information on intentional thought, see Claude Bristol's "The Magic of Believing."
For more information on visualization, see: "How to Achieve Your Goals Without Using 'Will Power.'"

In no particular order, here are just a few the other practical applications of hyperempiria, or suggestion-enhanced experience, contained on this Blog,  You can learn how to:
See also the following print sources:

Gibbons, D. E. (2001). Experience as an art form. .New York, NY: Authors Choice Press.


Gibbons, D. E. (2000). Applied hypnosis and hyperempiria. Lincoln, NE: Authors Choice Press (originally published 1979 by Plenum Press).

Gibbons, D. E., & Cavallaro, L (2013).. Exploring alternate universes: And learning what they can teach us. Amazon Kindle E-Books. (Note: It is not necessary to own a Kindle reader to download this e-book, as the Kindle app may be downloaded free of charge to a standard desktop or laptop computer and to most cell phones.)

Gibbons, D. E., & Lynn, S. J. (2010). Hypnotic inductions: A primer. in S. J. Lynn, J. W. Rhue, & I. Kirsch (Eds.) Handbook of clinical hypnosis, 2nd ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, pp. 267-291.