Don E. Gibbons, Ph.D., NJ Licensed Psychologist #03513
This Blog is published for information and educational purposes only. No warranty, expressed or implied, is furnished with respect to the material contained in this Blog. The reader is urged to consult with his/her physician or a duly licensed mental health professional with respect to the treatment of any medical or psychological condition.

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The New Center for Counseling and Psychotherapy, LLC

The New Center for Counseling and Psychotherapy, LLC, is located at 675 Route 72 E Manahawkin, NJ 08050. Telephone us at(609)709-2043 and (609) 709-0009.Take Mill Creek Road South, just off Route 72, on the road to Beach Haven West.After about 400 feet, turn right into the office complex of Greater Coastal Realty. Then turn right and go past the Lyceum Gyn. Continue on to the Prudential Zack Building. We. are the last office at the end. We accept Medicare and most other major insurance.Weekend and evening office hours are avalable.

Saturday, February 6, 2016

How to THINK Like a Thin Person


Most diets simply do not work for most people most of the time. Because tdietrs have not learned to think like a thin person, after they have been on a diet for a while and lost some weight, they go back to making the same bad choices that made them overweight in the first place.

Cognitive-behavioral psychology is the study of the relationships between thinking, feeling, and behavior.  Unless we develop the habit of taking all three of these into account, in the same way that thin people do, we will continue living on a perpetual yo-yo of dieting to lose weight and then gaining it back again.

Cognitive-behavioral therapists often use a form called a thought record in order to examine just what goes on in the mind when we make those habitual decisions that keep getting us into trouble by eating the wrong things. You can see one lat www.getselfhelp.co.uk. You can make copies for your own use by using the print command on your computer, and you can also obtain different versions for a host of other purposes. along with a free online self-help course and other materials on how to use them.

For example, suppose you are putting in long hours and having to do more than your fair share at work because other people have been laid off, and your boss is driving you crazy. You start to gain weight because you have gotten into the habit of consoling yourself by eating too much. Here is an example of how a thought record might help you to put your choices under a microscope.


  • Where were you?   Watching television on the couch at home.
  • Emotion or feeling.  Fatigue. Lethargy. Craving for a snack.
  • Negative automatic thought.  I want to go to the kitchen and get some pretzels and beer.
  • Evidence that supports the thought.  I will enjoy them after a long hard day at work.
  • Evidence that does not support the thought.  I'm becoming a couch potato.
  • Alternative thought or autosuggestion.  I'm going get up and find other activities to enjoy.
  • Emotion or feeling. Relief (rating:60%); discomfort at having to get up (rating: 40%).  

  • Of course, you don't have to chronicle every decision this way in order to learn to think like a thin person. It only takes a few such exercises to the hang of it. But it is necessary to make a good beginning for cognitive-behavioral psychology to help you to keep your feet on the right path As Confucius said, "The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step!" 

    Then, visualization -- especially when combined with self-hypnosis -- can also be of great help in providing the incentives to guide you to your destination. 

    See also: 

    How to Eliminate Late-Night Snacking

    How to Get Thin and STAY Thin with Self-Hypnosis and Visualization


     Print References



    Beck, J. S. (2008).  The Beck Diet Solution: Train Your Brain to Think Like a Thin Person. Birmingham, AL: Oxmoor House.  (Judith Beck is the daughter of Aaron T. Beck, the founder of cognitive-behavioral therapy, and one of its most widely respected leaders in her own right. 

    (See also: www.beckdietsolution.com.)

    Moss, M. (2013). Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us.  New York, NY: Random House.

     

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    Tuesday, February 2, 2016

    How to Make Psychic Ability Work for You



    Matter and energy are two forms of the same thing!

    If I had not had a similar experience with this book in my own life, I wouldn't put this up here. 

    I begin with a brief tape of a series of interviews with Phyllis Diller, in which she discusses the effect which The Magic of Believing, has had on her life. Following this are videotapes containing all eight parts of the book itself, with commentary.

    Bristol's genius lies in the fact that he makes no reference to religious or philosophical concepts, nor does he use the word "psychic." Since all religious traditions employ some form of the magic of believing, then the magic of believing clearly does not "belong" to any one of them.  It is an ability  which we all possess, and is a form of hyperempiria, or suggestion-enhanced experience.  
    Good listening!


    (Note: If the video does not work, click on this link to watch it on YouTube, and when it is over, hit the return button on your browser to view the rest of this posting.)




    Although Mr. Bristol makes no reference to theology, and neither does he refer to any philosophical concepts, you're welcome to bring your own if you want. Phyllis points out that this is apparently what they did in creating the book, The Secret, which emphasizes "the law of attraction:" that merely thinking positive thoughts will supposedly attract positive events to you, and negative thinking will attract negative events. But for Bristol, all you actually have to believe is the goal that you have chosen. If you can believe in it -- deeply and sincerely enough -- you can believe it. And if you can believe it, you can make it happen!


    The Magic of Believing, Part One:


    (Note: If the video does not work, click on this link to watch it on YouTube, and when it is over, hit the return button on your browser to view the rest of this posting.)



    Believing works -- but don't confuse beliefs with percptions. I may believe that Benecia is still the Capital of California, for example, even though it was moved to Sacramento many years ago; but all the belief in the world will not change a fact that has already happened. Believing, as Bristol is using the term, refers to an active force deep within us, which acts upon the environment to bring about the result which your belief has created.

    Even here, you shouldn't overdo it. My degree is in general experimental psychology, and I taught classes in statistics for many years. Random events do happen, and the laws of chance are just as valid as any other physical phenomena. Specific things don't just happen because of some "law of attraction" which is the result of your broadcasting negative or positive energy --  unless you will them to! We all have a natural tendency to view events which occur together as causing one another, but this is not always the case. If you discover one morning that you have a flat tire, is it because you have been sending out negative thoughts, or because the juvenile delinquent next door decided to work out his hostilities? 


    The Magic of Believing, Part Two:


    (Note: If the video does not work, click on this link to watch it on YouTube, and when it is over, hit the return button on your browser to view the rest of this posting.)


    One method of insuring that your entire being is involved in the content of a visualized experience is to use the Best Me Technique of multimodal suggestion, which utilizes the simultaneous involovement of Beliefs, Emotions, Sensations and physical perceptions, Thoughts and Images, Motives, and Expectations.


    The Magic of Believing, Part Three:


    (Note: If the video does not work, click on this link to watch it on YouTube, and when it is over, hit the return button on your browser to view the rest of this posting.)



    Today, some sixty-five years after The Magic of Believing was written, most brain researchers  now agree that we have two ways of looking at a problem or situation: the step-by-step, verbal, left-brain approach, and the holistic, intuitive, right-brain approach which we used to refer to as "the unconscious."  However, one method is not superior to the other. In sizing up a situation, sometimes we need to look at the trees and sometimes we need to step back and look at the forest. By assigning these functions to the two separate hemispheres, our brain allows us to do both! 


    The Magic of Believing, Part Four:


    (Note: If the video does not work, click on this link to watch it on YouTube, and when it is over, hit the return button on your browser to view the rest of this posting.)



    Social scientists are familiar with the concept of a self-fulfilling prophecy. A run on a bank is often used as a good example. if enough people believe that a bank is going to fail, they all rush to take their money out -- and the bank does fail, but only because this belief was so strongly and widely held that it became a self-fulfilling prophecy; for without such a belief, the bank would have remained financially sound. Many successful salesmen owe their careers to the fact that their belief in themselves helps to see them through tough times, and provides them with the sincerity and conviction to convince wavering customers. But is there something more to the magic of believing than the conviction that which causes events to happen simply because they are self-fulfilling prophecies? Claude Bristol thinks so -- and so do a lot of others!



    The Magic of Believing, Part Five:


    (Note: If the video does not work, click on this link to watch it on YouTube, and when it is over, hit the return button on your browser to view the rest of this posting.)


    If we can picture a goal in our mind and believe that it is already ours, using repetition and pictures to engage the holistic power of the right brain,  this allows us to also experience the rewards of that achievement now, in the present, when they are most needed to motivate us to bring it into being, without having to rely on "will power" to drive us onward. This process involves the use of a special kind of creative meditation which, like all other forms of meditation, is a skill which requires constant practice if we are to make the most of it.


    The Magic of Believing, Part Six:


    (Note: If the video does not work, click on this link to watch it on YouTube, and when it is over, hit the return button on your browser to view the rest of this posting.)



    In addition to looking in the mirror to give yourself positive autosuggestions, I recommend using either self-hypnosis or meditation, both of which prepare the mind for receiving autosuggestions, and both of which have been shown to be highly effective over time, provided that the goal is a properly chosen one which you can truly believe in.


    The Magic of Believing, Parts Seven and Eight:


    (Note: If the video does not work, click on this link to watch it on YouTube, and when it is over, hit the return button on your browser to view the rest of this posting.)



    There is an old saying, "Be careful what you wish for -- you may get it!"  Even if you are certain at the beginning that the goal you have chosen is one that you can believe in with your whole heart, when you get there you may find that it isn't what you wanted after all. Instead of giving up and allowing doubt to intrude, change the original goal or find a new one!
                                        


    See also:




    Sunday, January 24, 2016

    A Cognitive-Behavioral Treasury of Free Information Downloads

    The following two Websites:

    http://www.getselfhelp.co.uk, and www.psychologytools.org,  contain the most interesting and varied resources I have found for free materials on cognitive-behavioral psychology that you can download for personal use, in order to get rid of the ideas and perceptions that can cause you needless misery if they are not dealt with. There are also numerous practical applications for improving the quality of everyday life. (See, for example, The Science of THINKING Thin: The Cognitive-Behavioral Diet.)

    Cognitive-behavioral therapists frequently use a document called a thought record in order to examine just what goes on in the mind when we make those habitual decisions that keep getting us into trouble  An example of a thought record and how to use it s also available.  They also have other free versions of the thought record form, adapted for special purposes, including:

    • Panic Attacks
    • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
    • Flashbacks 
    • Social Anxiety 
    • Anger
    • Body Dysmorphia
    • Obsessions and Compulsions
    • OCD/Perfectionism
    • Depression
    • Additional downoads for record-keeping are also available.
    You can make as many copies as you want for your own use by using the print command on your computer. In addition, there is a free online self-help course and other materials on how to use them. Of course, I cannot be responsible for the accuracy or the effectiveness of self-help materials downloaded from the Internet. Moreover as a practicing clinical psychologist, I am perhaps a little more conservative than they are about what can legitimately be included within the category of "self-help." Nevertheless, for some situations, it may be worth a look!