Don E. Gibbons, Ph.D., NJ Licensed Psychologist #03513
This Blog is published for information and educational purposes only. No warranty, expressed or implied, is furnished with respect to the material contained in this Blog. The reader is urged to consult with his/her physician or a duly licensed mental health professional with respect to the treatment of any medical or psychological condition.

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The New Center for Counseling and Psychotherapy, LLC

The New Center for Counseling and Psychotherapy, LLC, is located at 675 Route 72 E Manahawkin, NJ 08050. Telephone us at(609)709-2043 and (609) 709-0009.Take Mill Creek Road South, just off Route 72, on the road to Beach Haven West.After about 400 feet, turn right into the office complex of Greater Coastal Realty. Then turn right and go past the Lyceum Gyn. Continue on to the Prudential Zack Building. We. are the last office at the end. We accept Medicare and most other major insurance.Weekend and evening office hours are avalable.

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Friday, August 30, 2013

How to Start Your Own Hypnosis Cult

It's easier to tell high-responders in hypnosis
that they are communicating with the Divine
than it is to tell them that they are a chicken!
 -
There is a woman up the road from me who hypnotizes people and tells them the name of their guardian angels, and which ones to pray to for whatever request they would like make. How the heck does SHE know? Recently, however, a former client of hers told me that he had learned to "speak in tongues" several years ago; and every night, he prays in tongues both to the Trinity and to the guardian angel whom this woman has identified for him.  

It's probably easier to tell high responders in hypnosis that they are communicating with the Divine, experiencing a past life, a future life, or life between lives, than it is to tell them that they are a chicken, as stage hypnotists and entertainers have been known to do. This is true because the suggestion that a person is a chicken is strongly contrary to one's existing belief systems. However, if a suggestion sufficiently enhances the ongoing narrative of a person's  life story, then it will not only be accepted at the time it was given, but it may continue to be believed in after the hypnotic session is ended, as was the case with my client who continued to pray to the "guardian angel"  identified by a hypnotist. If you provide suggestions of this type to several people who continue to meet regularly in support of these beliefs, you could be well on your way to starting your own hypnosis cult.  

Deception is not necessary, however, in order to benefit from the power of suggestion. As long as people understand that they are using their hypnotic imagination to experience things which are fundamentally unknowable except by faith, and that the experience is real, regardless of whether or not it corresponds to something that is actually "out there," then it is not a cult, because your hypnosis clients are "in on it."

Post-modern constructionism is the point of view that we should help clients to piece together whatever conceptual framework will help them to make sense of their existence, regardless of the reality which we have constructed for ourselves. As a post-modern constructionist, I would not hesitate to utilize any kind of believed-in imaginings that will help clients to alleviate distress and find meaning and purpose in life. regardless of the beliefs which I personally employ in order to build such an understanding for myself. And if this means enhancing the religious or philosophical beliefs which they already have, then so be it. But what about creating an entirely new set of beliefs? 

For example, If the number of alternate Universes is truly infinite, as some physicists now maintain, then it is possible to use the higher powers of the imagination to experience any one of these possible Universes in hypnosis just as if we were really there. If the number of parallel universes is theoretically without limit, there is – somewhere – an alternate universe where we can bathe in an ocean of infinite, unbounded, and everlasting love, freed from the limitations of space and time, to satisfy these deepest longings, enhance our self-esteem, and overcome all our feelings of unhappiness, loneliness, anger, and despair. 

Many physicists now believe that the number of possible alternate universes is theoretically unlimited. By hypnotically experiencing an alternate universe in which a goal has already been achieved, we can experience now, in the present, the full rewards of future goals in order to provide ourselves with the confidence and motivation to achieve them. We can thus become truly free to want to do what we know that we ought to do in order to develop our potential to the fullest. This greatly increases our sense of personal freedom, by lessening or eliminating the need for what is commonly referred to as "will power," or the need to push ourselves to do something instead of merely pushing the work alone. This includes such common problems as losing weight, becoming a non-smoker, earning a better annual evaluation at work, or improving one's grade-point average. 

Regardless of whatever else may be going on in our lives, we can also “get away” to an alternate universe and come back as refreshed as if we had been away for a week, a month, or even longer.  The newly-published e-book, Exploring Alternate Universes -- And Learning What They Can Teach Us, by Gibbons and Cavallaro, will show you how.  (It's a Kindle e-book, but if you don't happen to own a Kindle you can download it onto your laptop or smartphone.)

See Also:
Suggestion-Enhanced Experience in Native American Culture
Were You Saved or Were You Hypnotized?

Scroll down for a list of some of the most popular sites on this Blog. 
Below this list are the most recent Blog entries. 
For an easily accessible list of all Blog postings, see the list entitled, "Blog Archive" in the column at the right of this page.


 

Here are some of our most popular sites:
The Blog contains many other examples of experience as an art form, for the enhancement of human potential, the ennoblement of the human spirit, and the fulfillment of human existence.


See also the following print sources:

Gibbons, D. E. (2001). Experience as an art form. .New York, NY: Authors Choice Press.

Gibbons, D. E. (2000). Applied hypnosis and hyperempiria. Lincoln, NE: Authors Choice Press (originally published 1979 by Plenum Press).

Gibbons, D. E., & Cavallaro, L (2013).. Exploring alternate universes: And learning what they can teach us. Amazon Kindle E-Books. (Note: It is not necessary to own a Kindle reader to download this e-book, as the Kindle app may be downloaded free of charge to a standard desktop or laptop computer and to most cell phones.)

Gibbons, D. E., & Lynn, S. J. (2010). Hypnotic inductions: A primer. in S. J. Lynn, J. W. Rhue, & I. Kirsch (Eds.) Handbook of clinical hypnosis, 2nd ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, pp. 267-291.



Tuesday, August 27, 2013

How to Meditate using Self-Hypnosis

"As a rabbit, I am an expert in meditation."

Imagine a rabbit on the edge of a field of grass, who happens to spot a fox looking at him from the other side of the field. The rabbit freezes, and a moment later the fox disappears from view. The rabbit calmly goes back to searching for the nearest tender blade of grass. But if that rabbit had the brain of a human being, he might well have been anxiously wondering, "What if that fox has a burrow in the next field? What if he comes back to get me?" But of course, there would be nothing that the rabbit could do about it.

Meditators, through dilligent practice, can learn to "switch their brains off" when anxiety can serve no useful purpose. Similarly, they can learn how not to unduly depress themselves with regret over things which cannot now be changed, and to calm the fires of anger when rage can serve no constructive purpose.

Meditation can be even more effective for relieving anger, anxiety, panic, and depression when it is combined with self-hypnosis.  The following video by +Richard Nongard provides an example of how the two techniques can be used together.  

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Scroll down for a list of some of the most popular sites on this Blog. 
Below this list are the most recent Blog entries. 
For an easily accessible list of all Blog postings, see the list entitled, "Blog Archive" in the column at the right of this page.


 

Here are some of our most popular sites:
The Blog contains many other examples of experience as an art form, for the enhancement of human potential, the ennoblement of the human spirit, and the fulfillment of human existence.


See also the following print sources:

Gibbons, D. E. (2001). Experience as an art form. .New York, NY: Authors Choice Press.

Gibbons, D. E. (2000). Applied hypnosis and hyperempiria. Lincoln, NE: Authors Choice Press (originally published 1979 by Plenum Press).

Gibbons, D. E., & Cavallaro, L (2013).. Exploring alternate universes: And learning what they can teach us. Amazon Kindle E-Books. (Note: It is not necessary to own a Kindle reader to download this e-book, as the Kindle app may be downloaded free of charge to a standard desktop or laptop computer and to most cell phones.)

Gibbons, D. E., & Lynn, S. J. (2010). Hypnotic inductions: A primer. in S. J. Lynn, J. W. Rhue, & I. Kirsch (Eds.) Handbook of clinical hypnosis, 2nd ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, pp. 267-291.



Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Subliminal Perception? It's Mostly a Hoax, Folks!

Here's an experiment you can perform yourself. Call up the nearest university which has a graduate department of psychology, and ask to speak to the professor who teaches courses in perception. When you get a faculty member who is willing to answer your question, ask him or her about the status of research which demonstrates the validity of subliminal perception, and when the hysterical laughter at the other end of the line dies down you will have your answer. 

The consensus of current research is that, within certain limits, the response to a stimulus is proportionate to the intensity of that stimulus. The fainter the stimulus, the lesser is the response tendency.  

In response to the scandal created when a few gullible advertisers were taken in by the claims of those who stood to make a buck by hawking subliminal perception techniques, some jurisdictions passed laws against their use. But paranoia is not the same thing as proof. (After all, the Puritans also had laws against witchcraft.) 

In the American Psychological Association's searchable data base on publications in psychology, there was an article published in January of this year in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, vol. 48 number 1, pp. 258-360 by  Legal, Chappe, Coiffard, and Villard-Forest, entitled, "Don't you know that you want to trust me? Subliminal goal priming and persuasion."  Before being presented with a persuasive message about the consumption of tap water, the experimenters subliminally primed one group of subjects, with the goal "to trust," and did not prime others. Then the subjects were given a questionnaire about their perception of the persuasive message, the source of the message, and their intentions to consume tap water. The results indicated that the primed subjects had a better evaluation of the message, and expressed a greater intention to consume tap water.

Of course, one swallow does not a summer make. And time will tell whether or not this study is replicable. Jason Nier, in an article entitled, "What Every Skeptic should Know about Subliminal Persuasion," in The Skeptical Inquirer, vol. 16, 1992, forcibly argued that research into the area of subliminal persuasion was "either fraudulent or flawed." 

The controversy was not completely laid to rest, however.  Later, in the same publication (vol. 23, 1999), Epley, Savitsky, and Kachelsky, while admitting that much of the earlier research on subliminal pursuasion was flawed, concluded, "more recent research using better methodologies have demonstrated that subliminal perception can influence behavior."  So the beat goes on. But clearly, the claims for the efficacy of subliminal perception have been exaggerated.

In establishing statistically significant results of an experiment, one calculates the likelihood that the results which you obtain could have been obtained by chance alone; and if the odds against chance are high enough, you accept your hypothesis. But in order to be accepted as an established scientific finding, the name of the game is replicability, or the extent to which a given experimental finding can be repeatable at will under the same controlled conditions.  In the fifty years since the claim about subliminal perception was first made, several studies on this topic have been conducted. Despite the occasional positive finding amidst the considerable effort which has been devoted to its pursuit, the goal of scientific replicability has to date not been achieved. Thresholds (or Limens) of perception do vary, as you can easily verify yourself when you hear your name spoken at the next table in a crowded restaurant, but this is not the same thing as subliminal perception. We are definitely attuned to pick up meaningful stimuli more easily than stimuli which are not meaningful. This has been studied ever since the days of Wundt in the late 1800s, and it forms a big chunk of the experimental literature on perception. But subliminal perception? its mostly a hoax, folks!

Saturday, August 3, 2013

How to Overcome Perfectionism



Do the important things -- and then take time to enjoy life!
The following list is adapted from a posting on www.smartrecovery.org. The difference between these statements and other types of "positive thinking" affirmations is that these statements are all true, we just don't always realize that they are! So when you concentrate on accepting one of these statements you don't get the feeling that you are merely lying to yourself, as you might do if you were to try to accept a different type of affirmation such as, "I am effective and serene in social situations," when you know very well that you are not.

Since the suggestions which we receive in hypnosis, or the ones we give to ourselves in self-hypnosis, are often more effective than the things we say to ourselves in everyday life, this list provides us with an excellent source of suggestions or autosuggestions if perfectionism has been a difficulty for you. However, a hypnotic induction is not necessary for these affirmations to be accepted. You simply need to go over them a few times each day in your mind until they become part of your everyday reality, much as you might repeat a set of physical exercises until you have reached the level of comfort you desire.


If your perfectionism is more than the "everyday garden variety" which we all experience at times, you may need to explore the possibility of talk therapy and/or psychotropic medication in order to obtain a satisfactory resolution.  But for almost everybody, incorporating the following beliefs into your philosophy of life will enable you to enjoy life a great deal more!
  • No one can be totally perfect.
  • I'm not perfect and I never will be — tough!
  • It's okay to want to do my best. Doing well does not necessarily mean being the best.
  • I perform in many different roles and it is highly unlikely that I will excel in every role at all times.
  • Just because I make a mistake does not mean I am a mistake.
  • To be human is to err.
  • The pressure I put on myself to perform perfectly is an unrealistic pressure that can actually cause me to perform worse because I will be worried and nervous.
  • The pressure I put on myself to perform perfectly creates an extra source of stress that can affect me emotionally and physically.
  • Trying to do my best is a reasonable goal, but it will not always be achieved.
  • Few things in life are exact. Things can be done in a variety of ways and have many different solutions.
  • People do not always agree on what is correct or right. Judgments are often subjective.
  • I will try to set my own realistic goals, please myself, and have the strength to be creative and different in the face of others' potential disapproval.
  • Our whole society is geared to expect that people will make mistakes and errors. Examples are traffic tickets, prison, consumer recalls, consumer complaints, refunds, legal suits, etc.
  • True friends accept imperfection.
  • Mistakes do not equal incompetence. Mistakes are just mistakes —period! 
Scroll down for a list of some of the most popular sites on this Blog. 
Below this list are the most recent Blog entries. 
For an easily accessible list of all Blog postings, see the list entitled, "Blog Archive" in the column at the right of this page.

 

Here are some of our most popular sites:
The Blog contains many other examples of experience as an art form, for the enhancement of human potential, the ennoblement of the human spirit, and the fulfillment of human existence.


See also the following print sources:

Gibbons, D. E. (2001). Experience as an art form. .New York, NY: Authors Choice Press.

Gibbons, D. E. (2000). Applied hypnosis and hyperempiria. Lincoln, NE: Authors Choice Press (originally published 1979 by Plenum Press).

Gibbons, D. E., & Cavallaro, L (2013).. Exploring alternate universes: And learning what they can teach us. Amazon Kindle E-Books. (Note: It is not necessary to own a Kindle reader to download this e-book, as the Kindle app may be downloaded free of charge to a standard desktop or laptop computer and to most cell phones.)

Gibbons, D. E., & Lynn, S. J. (2010). Hypnotic inductions: A primer. in S. J. Lynn, J. W. Rhue, & I. Kirsch (Eds.) Handbook of clinical hypnosis, 2nd ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, pp. 267-291.



Hypnosis for the Experientially Gifted

We are used to thinking about cognitive intelligence, as measured by the I.Q., and lately we have been hearing about emotional intelligence, or the ability to get along well with others. I believe that there is yet a third kind of intelligence, experiential intelligence, which is only now emerging in human evolution, and which is presently accessed most easily by hypnosis and related techniques.
Hilgard referred to people who respond well to hypnosis as "hypnotic virtuosos," because of the large number of things which this enables them to accomplish. -- pre-experiencing the rewards of distant goals in order to motivate ourselves in the present, or suppressing the sensation of pain, and a host of other things which most regular visitors to my hyperempiria Blog are fully aware of.

 If you hand someone a violin and tell them that they can make beautiful music with it, most people can learn to play it passably well if they truly wish to do so. But others can learn to make such beautiful music that we are astonished at their performance. And so it is with the hypnotic virtuosos. To the public at large, their performance is indeed astonishing, but hypnotists know it all too well.

 In the words of an old song, "Let's face the music and dance." We need to devote more of our efforts into working with the experientially gifted, to help them make the most of their abilities. And when they do, we will all be able to dance in celebration along with them, because they will have inspired us too.

We need to have some sort of an Olympic forum for hypnosis, so that these world-class performers can learn from one another, and inspire the rest of us to emulate them. But this would not be the hypnotic equivalent of Mensa. The group would be open to everyone, regardless of their level of hypnotic performance, with the goal of helping everybody to maximize their potential. As +michael ellner  recently stated, quoting Confucius,  "Tell me and I forget. Show me and I remember. Let me do and I understand." I hope that everybody who is interested will contact me, hyperempiria@gmail.com, to consider the formation of such a group.
 
Scroll down for a list of some of the most popular sites on this Blog. 
Below this list are the most recent Blog entries. 
For an easily accessible list of all Blog postings, see the list entitled, "Blog Archive" in the column at the right of this page.


 

Here are some of our most popular sites:
The Blog contains many other examples of experience as an art form, for the enhancement of human potential, the ennoblement of the human spirit, and the fulfillment of human existence.


See also the following print sources:

Gibbons, D. E. (2001). Experience as an art form. .New York, NY: Authors Choice Press.

Gibbons, D. E. (2000). Applied hypnosis and hyperempiria. Lincoln, NE: Authors Choice Press (originally published 1979 by Plenum Press).

Gibbons, D. E., & Cavallaro, L (2013).. Exploring alternate universes: And learning what they can teach us. Amazon Kindle E-Books. (Note: It is not necessary to own a Kindle reader to download this e-book, as the Kindle app may be downloaded free of charge to a standard desktop or laptop computer and to most cell phones.)

Gibbons, D. E., & Lynn, S. J. (2010). Hypnotic inductions: A primer. in S. J. Lynn, J. W. Rhue, & I. Kirsch (Eds.) Handbook of clinical hypnosis, 2nd ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, pp. 267-291.